A Typical Day on the Job for a Radiation Therapy Tech

The battle against the Big C is ongoing, but the odds are slowly tipping in the direction of effective management, and possibly a cure. Many treatment milestones have improved the chances of cancer patients to survive from 10% to 70%, and one of the more significant ones is radiation therapy.

It was actually more than a century before, in 1903, that radiation was first used as a way to zap cancer cells, but it was a rather hit-and-miss affair. It did zap cancer cell, but it also killed normal cells. However, since the early part of the 1990s, modern technological advances allowed the development of a more precise targeting of cancer cells, thus minimizing the damage to normal cells. Radiation therapy is currently one of the most common types of cancer treatments and is used in combination with other therapies.

Radiation therapy technologists

A radiation oncologist is a primary mover behind any type of radiation treatment for cancer, but they serve more as a planner and director rather than a doer.

The man (or woman) behind the mask during radiation treatments is not a medical doctor, but a radiation therapy technologist or radiation therapist. They specialize in the administration of radiation treatments using linear accelerators, a machine that shoots high-energy X-rays at cancer cells. They are also qualified to operate a CT (Computer Tomography) scanner, which “maps” the area to be zapped. They work as part of a team which includes the radiation oncologist, oncology nurses, and medical physicists.

A day on the job

Radiation therapists work regular hours, typically from 9 am to 5 pm, from Mondays to Fridays. While this may seem like a sweet deal for someone working in healthcare, radiation therapists are almost constantly on their feet for that time.

Regular radiation treatments are scheduled outpatient services, but there is a high demand for it. A radiation therapist will treat one patient every 15 minutes on average. This includes:

  • Explaining the treatment for the day and answering any questions
  • Reviewing the patient chart to check the diagnosis, prescription, and identity of the patient
  • Positioning the patients correctly
  • Ensuring that safety protocols for both patients and operators are in place
  • Checking the radiation doses programmed in the machine against the prescription to make sure it is correct
  • Operating the machine
  • Monitoring the patient
  • Keeping precise records of each treatment session for each patient

Education and licensing

A radiation therapy technologist has to have at least an associate’s degree in radiation therapy. In most states, you also need a state license and accreditation from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

Many colleges and universities, as well as vocational schools, offer associate (two-year) and bachelor’s (4-year) degree programs for radiation therapy. However, most states require applicants for a license to complete an ARRT-approved program and pass the certification exam first. States that do not have these requirements include:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska – you need ARRT certification if you want to work with a facility accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Michigan – except those that work with mammography equipment
  • Missouri
  • Nevada – same as Michigan
  • New Hampshire
  • North Carolina
  • South Dakota

In order to qualify for an associate or bachelor’s degree program, you must have be a high school graduate or hold a GED certificate. These programs include the minimum acceptable standards for academic proficiency and hands-on training for the work, as well as workshops dealing with techniques in patient care, radiation therapy ethics, and advances in radiation treatment.

Associate degree

Program courses required for an associate degree include:

  • Human anatomy and physiology
  • Radiologic technology
  • Imaging and processing techniques
  • Sectional pathology
  • Medical terminology

Bachelor’s degree

In addition to the course covered in an associate degree program, courses for a bachelor’s degree include:

  • Advanced patient care
  • Biological aspects of radiation therapy
  • Maintenance of radiation equipment
  • Radiation protection protocols
  • Ethical practices

Continuing education

While some employers are willing to take on radiation therapy technologists with no experience, they do require them to attend workshops or on-the-job training to develop their skills in the field. Some employers also require a minimum number of continuing education credits a year for their radiation therapists.

Skillsets required

Aside from education and training, radiation therapists need to have other skillsets as well. They constantly interact with team members and patients, so they have to have good communication skills. They should be able to take direction as they are tasked with keeping detailed records of each patient and to put down their professional impressions on the health and well-being of the patient, they need good writing skills to express themselves in a clear and concise manner.

Radiation therapists should also be able to think on their feet and be physically fit, as some patients will have to be turned or actually lifted. They also have to be careful, because they risk radiation exposure every time they operate the machine. In most cases, radiation therapy techs are in another room while the treatment is ongoing.

Salary and job outlook

The good news is an entry-level radiation therapist with an associate degree in the US as a whole makes a median salary of $78,368 a year, although this can vary widely from state to state.

http://www1.salary.com/Radiation-Therapist-ARRT-salary.html

What this chart means is that about half of all radiation therapists in the US make less than $78,368 a year, and the other half makes more. To give you an idea of the variation, here are some cities with basic salary ranges for ARRT-certified radiation therapists as of February 2017:

  • Atlanta, Georgia ( $70,282-$86,806)
  • Chicago, Illinois ($74,393-$91,883)
  • Houston, Texas ($71,285-$88,045)
  • Jacksonville, Florida ($68,259-$84,307)
  • Boston, Massachusetts ( $79,894-$98,678)
  • New York, New York ($82,031-$101,317)
  • Columbus, Ohio ($67,896-$83,859)
  • San Antonio, Texas ($70,680-$87,298)
  • Indianapolis, Indiana ($69,550-$85,901)
  • Louis, Missouri ($69,647-$86,021)

However, what is more, important for those of you considering getting a degree in radiation therapy technology is that according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the job outlook for this type of work is promising, the demand expected to increase by 14% between 2014 and 2024.

BIO

Laura Buckler is freelance writer always trying to take an in-depth, hands-on approach in writing her articles. She believes that everything in our life is simple and achievable and tries to help people recognize their own potential. You can follow her ontwitter.

Featured Programs

WELCOME TO KAPLAN UNIVERSITY

Online Education That Fits Your Life

For 80 years, we’ve been preparing students for career success. We’ve led the wayso that our students can too.

Globally Renowned Purdue to Acquire Kaplan University

Purdue University, one of the nation's most respected universities, will acquire Kaplan University and create a new, nonprofit, public institution within the Purdue system. Pending regulatory approvals, this exciting transition is expected to take place later this year. This change will be seamless—during the transition, you will still be able to enroll at Kaplan University, earn a high-quality education, and meet your educational and career goals.

Programs:

  • Health Information Management

The Metropolitan Institute of Health and Technology (MIHT) is dedicated to educating men and women to serve with confidence in the health and technology industry. MIHT provides career training for students to move forward in their chosen field of study, changing their lives for the better. MIHT strives to provide quality education with affordable tuition. Our staff works to determine the best financial options for students on an individualized level.

Programs:

  • Electronic Health Records
Locations: Lorton

CTU can help you connect to what matters most: a powerful professional network, faculty who are real-world professionals and innovative technology. And now several CTU degree programs are ranked by U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2015.  Are you in?

Programs:

  • Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management - Health Informatics

Experience the Rewards of Caring, With ECPI’s Medical Careers Institute, you can Earn Your Bachelor’s Degree in 2.5 Years or Your Associate’s Even Sooner through Our Year-Round Schedule!

 

What Are You Waiting For?

Programs:

  • Surgical Technology - Associate's
Locations: Richmond

Logan is a non-profit university founded in 1935. Logan University has remained grounded in chiropractic education, while continuously enriching academic options with degree offerings in health sciences since 2012.

Programs:

  • Master of Science - Health Informatics
Adelphi University’s roots reach back to 1863 and the founding of the Adelphi Academy, a private preparatory school in Brooklyn, New York. The Academy was incorporated in 1869 and its Board of Trustees was charged with establishing a first class institution for the broadest and most thorough training, and to make its advantages as accessible as possible to the largest numbers of our population. The school quickly gained a reputation for its innovative curriculum, particularly in physical culture and early childhood education.

Programs:

  • Master of Science in Healthcare Informatics

Fortis Institute can give you the skills you need to train for a career in the healthcare field.

* Programs vary by location

* Please contact each individual campus for accreditation information


Programs:

  • Sterile Processing Technician
  • Surgical Technology
Locations: Richmond

The University

With over 80 years of academic achievements, Jacksonville University is a traditional, longstanding institution consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of America's best colleges.

Programs:

  • MS Health Informatics
Disclaimer: School programs and details may change over time. Contact schools for current information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *